Revised: Sep. 17, 2001 September-December 2001

UW-MADISON CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT
CHEMISTRY 103
Lecture Section 1
MWF 11:00 A.M. — Room 1351 Chemistry
www.scifun.org

32 Years

General Chemistry: 4 credit hours
Lecturer: Professor Bassam Z. Shakhashiri
Office: 9349 Chemistry
Telephone: 262-0538
E-Mail: bassam@chem.wisc.edu (please include your lab section number and your TA's name in your messages to me)
Office Hours: Mondays 1:45 - 3:30 p.m. Also, by appointment. Students are encouraged to see me immediately after class near the lecture table.

You should obtain a copy of each handout when it is distributed in lecture or from your T.A

ALWAYS BRING THIS SYLLABUS TO CLASS


CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION CHEMICAL OF THE WEEK
CONNECTIONS CHEM TIPS
TEXTBOOKS AND OTHER MATERIAL    EXAM STUDY QUESTIONS
COURSE FORMAT HOMEWORK EXERCISES
   LECTURES ADDITIONAL ACTIVITIES
DISCUSSION (QUIZ) SECTION BULL SESSIONS
LABORATORY KEEP IN TOUCH WITH INSTRUCTORS
DISCUSSION AND LAB TIMETABLE HELPFUL STUDY HINTS
E-MAIL ADDRESSES FOR TA'S UNIVERSITY COUNSELING SERVICE
ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE, PROGRESS, AND ACCOMPLISHMENT STUDY SKILLS
MISCONDUCT AND CHEATING TEST ANXIETY
GRADES WRITING LAB
EXAMINATIONS GUTS TUTORING SERVICE
POST-EXAM OPTION ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE
LEARNING AIDS NATIONAL CHEMISTRY WEEK
COOPERATIVE LEARNING GROUPS GUIDELINES FOR DEMONSTRATION NOTES
LEARNING COMMUNITIES COURSE OUTLINE
WORKBOOK FOR GENERAL CHEMISTRY LECTURE/LABORATORY SCHEDULE


INTRODUCTION

Chemistry 103 is the first semester course in a two semester General Chemistry sequence. The second semester course is Chemistry 104. Chemistry 103 and 104 are a unit, and students who take Chemistry 103 should plan to take Chemistry 104 also. Chemistry 103 and 104 provide a general background concerning the principles and factual basis of chemistry. The 103-104 sequence serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses such as Organic Chemistry (341 or 343) and Analytical Chemistry (221 or 223).

The prerequisites for this course are Math 101 or placement at or above Math 112; concurrent registration in Math 112 or above and one year of high school chemistry are recommended. Students who have not taken a high school chemistry course should expect to commit some extra time to this course, particularly in the early weeks of the session. If you have not had chemistry before, you should seek advice from your instructor immediately.

These General Chemistry courses explore chemical phenomena and principles with emphasis on developing an understanding of chemistry and an appreciation of what chemists do. You must commit yourself to learning the basic vocabulary of chemistry. You will acquire skills in dealing with chemical phenomena and principles and in manipulating mathematical expressions that describe chemical behavior.

I am especially interested in having you develop an informed and sensible attitude toward chemistry in particular and science in general. In addition, I would like you to develop good study habits and skills so that you can fulfill your intellectual and emotional capabilities. Your T.A. and I need to be informed about what is good, bad, and indifferent about what we do.

CONNECTIONS

In this chemistry course we will encounter and use a robust vocabulary. Several of the words begin with the letter "C" and one of the most significant is: CONNECTIONS. It is important that you strive to make connections among all aspects of the course material: facts, principles, theories, explanations, etc. in order to increase your knowledge and to deepen your understanding of the simple and complex relationships that make chemistry the central science.

Often the connections are easy to make, especially, if you seek to make them and if you seek help in making them. Mental connections are not always obvious and making them is greatly enhanced by one's eagerness, patience, determination, perseverance, and general emotional readiness to learn. The great joy of making discoveries comes from being focused and from being willing to learn from mistakes without succumbing to frustration.

It is important that you try to make connections, as appropriate, with other course material that you may have had or with what you are learning this semester in your other courses.

In addition, it is very important that you make connections with people and places. Personal connections with fellow students, teachers, experts, advisors, and others in our community will greatly enhance your academic progress and personal maturity. Furthermore, your emotional growth and development will greatly benefit from pursuing the rich offerings available in our community. Money magazine has rated Madison the Number 1 City in the country for 1996--enjoy the benefits of this rating and help to maintain it!

TEXTBOOKS AND OTHER MATERIAL

  1. Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity, 4th ed., John C. Kotz and Paul Treichel, Jr., Saunders College Publishing (1999).
  2. Chemistry 103/104 Laboratory Manual, Fall 2001, Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  3. Workbook for General Chemistry, 2nd Edition , Bassam Z. Shakhashiri and Rodney Schreiner, Stipes Publishing Company (2000).
  4. Carbonless laboratory notepad (100 pages), available at local book stores and in the lobby of the Chemistry Builiding.
  5. Safety goggles. Industrial quality eye protection is required in all chemistry laboratories. Safety goggles that fit over regular glasses can be purchased from local bookstores and drugstores.
  6. An inexpensive calculator is required. It should have capabilities for square roots, logarithms and inverse logarithms, and exponential (scientific) notation operations. The calculator will be used on exams, quizzes, homework assignments and in the laboratory.

COURSE FORMAT

LECTURES. During lectures we will discuss principles, outline goals, and present illustrations and demonstrations. To prepare for lecture, you should read the suggested readings in the Course Outline. During lecture, take your own thorough notes. Be sure to take effective notes about the demonstrations; the Guidelines for Demonstration Notes should help you do this. (In addition, a set of lecture notes will be available in the General Chemistry Computer Room, Room 1327, where they may be duplicated.) After lecture you should review your notes and study the appropriate readings and work the suggested exercises. (The answers to many of the exercises are provided in the book.) In addition, I will suggest exercises in lecture.

DISCUSSION (QUIZ) SECTION. A group of 22 or fewer students constitutes a discussion and laboratory section supervised by one Teaching Assistant. Discussion sections are for review and problem solving relevant to the recent lecture material. The sessions include short quizzes to help evaluate your progress. You should be prepared when you come to the discussion class. Ask specific questions of your T.A. Make sure you understand the questions and the answers given by your T.A. and fellow students.

LABORATORY. In laboratory you will have the opportunity to experience directly some of the relationships discussed in lectures and in the textbook and to apply experimental techniques to solving chemical problems. Laboratory work is, by nature, slow compared with text reading. You will succeed only with adequate preparation. You must read the experiment and complete the pre-lab assignment prior to coming to lab. We encourage you to discuss your work with your fellow students and T.A. while doing the experiment.

DISCUSSION AND LABORATORY TIMETABLE.

601 12:05 MW 2311 Chem   7:45-10:45 T 2325 Chem

  Tanya Knickerbocker

602 1:20 MW 2311 Chem   7:45-10:45 R 2325 Chem   Tanya Knickerbocker
603 1:20 MW 2307 Chem   7:45-10:45 T 2325 Chem   Beatriz DeGuia
604 2:25 MW 2307 Chem   7:45-10:45 R 2325 Chem   Beatriz DeGuia
605 1:20 MW 2373 Chem   11:00-2:00 T 2325 Chem   Eric Hansen
606 2:25 MW 2373 Chem   11:00-2:00 R 2325 Chem   Eric Hansen
607 7:45 TR B351 Chem   11:00-2:00 T 2325 Chem   Beth Nichols
608 8:50 TR B351 Chem   11:00-2:00 R 2325 Chem   Beth Nichols
609 8:50 TR B357 Chem   2:25-5:25 T 2325 Chem   Shea Ramey
610 9:55 TR B357 Chem   2:25-5:25 R 2325 Chem   Shea Ramey
611 1:20 MW 2385 Chem   2:25-5:25 T 2325 Chem   Ting Zheng
612 2:25 MW 2385 Chem   2:25-5:25 R 2325 Chem   Ting Zheng
613 2:25 TR 2307 Chem   7:45-10:45 W 2325 Chem   Wensha Yang
614 3:30 TR 2307 Chem   7:45-10:45 F 2325 Chem   Wensha Yang
615 11:00 TR 2311 Chem   7:45-10:45 W 2325 Chem   Dave Olszewski
616 12:00 TR 2311 Chem   7:45-10:45 F 2325 Chem   Dave Olszewski


E-mail addresses for TAs:

Beatriz DeGuia deguia@chem.wisc.edu
Eric Hansen ehansen@chem.wisc.edu
Tanya Knickerbocker tlknickerboc@students.wisc.edu
Beth Nichols bmnichols@students.wisc.edu
Dave Olszewski daveosh@chem.wisc.edu
Shea Ramey ramey@chem.wisc.edu
Wensha Yang wensha@chem.wisc.edu
Ting Zheng ting@chem.wisc.edu

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE, PROGRESS, AND ACCOMPLISHMENT

In this large course, the students have diverse backgrounds and different expectations. My expectations include individual accomplishment on the part of every student, so that all of you not only fulfill your capabilities, but also expand your capacity and enrich your life. Of great importance to me are the knowledge you acquire, the skills you cultivate, and the attitude you develop. I expect that by the end of the semester each of you will have enough accomplishment to be at least at the ACCEPTABLE level (see below). Everything the instructional staff does is aimed toward helping you achieve this goal.

To help you gauge your academic performance and progress I am offering you a collection of learning aids. For example, CHEM TIPS will enable you to discover in a timely manner those segments of the course that require more study on your part. Also, information from CHEM TIPS will help me and your Teaching Assistant in planning lecture and discussion sessions. Another learning aid you should take advantage of are the self-paced Workbook for General Chemistry Lessons. The self-paced approach helps you ascertain your own knowledge and level of understanding of chemistry.

Although grades are not the ultimate measure of your knowledge, abilities, or potential, they are useful guides to you and to others. Your level of accomplishment will be recognized at the end of the semester by the letter grade you receive for the course. Individual accomplishment is measured against course standards and not necessarily against the performance of other students. The course standards and levels of accomplishment are:

Points Accomplishment Level Letter Grade
90 - 100 Superior A
88 - 89 Excellent AB
80 - 87 Proficient B
78 - 79 Good BC
70 - 77 Acceptable C
60 - 69 Mediocre D
below 60 Unacceptable F

ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT AND CHEATING. In this course you are encouraged to study and prepare for quizzes and examinations with other students. However, when taking quizzes and examinations, and when writing laboratory reports, you are to work alone. The University regulations are very explicit about academic misconduct and cheating, and these regulations will be fully enforced. During examinations, we will apply a code of honor, under which you are to work alone and neither give nor receive help from any sources. Also, you are expected to help enforce this code.

GRADES. Your grades will be based on a maximum of 1000 points distributed as follows:

3 examinations 330 points
quizzes 180 points
laboratory 160 points
final examination 330 points

Quiz and lab grades will be normalized to a common scale at the end of the semester to minimize differences in grading practices in discussion/lab sections. Cumulative course grades will be scaled at the end of the semester, guided by the scale shown above and by class accomplishment.

The laboratory work is important to understanding and appreciating chemistry. You must successfully complete the laboratory assignments in order to receive a passing grade in the course. Exams may include questions based on the laboratory material.

Your T.A. will give quizzes approximately weekly in discussion section. These may be announced or unannounced. Your T.A. will provide detailed information about this and the conduct of the discussion/laboratory sessions.

EXAMINATIONS. All examinations will be worth 100 points each. There will be three exams of approximately 50 minutes each and a two-hour final examination. Please check the Lecture and Laboratory Schedule for the examination dates and times. The location of each exam will be announced later. Make-up exams will not be given.

POST EXAM OPTION. My expectation is that every student will perform at a threshold level or higher. The threshold level corresponds to a grade of 75 on an examination. Please note that this is near the middle of the Acceptable level of accomplishment described earlier.

Special Exam. Students who receive a grade below 75 on Exam I have an option of taking another exam on the same material. The special exam will be offered from 11:00 to 11:50 a.m. on the Friday following the regular exam and is worth 100 points. You are eligible to take this special exam only if you scored below 75 on the regular exam. (The special exam is not a late exam; you must take the regular exam to be eligible for the special exam.) The official score recorded for the exam will be the higher score of the two up to a maximum of 75.

   For example, if your score on regular Exam I is 64, you have the option of taking special Exam I. Should your score be 72 on the special exam, then that will be your official score for Exam I. Should your score be 83 on the special exam, then your official score on Exam I will be entered as 75, the maximum level you can achieve on a special exam. If you score 60 on the special exam, then your official score on Exam I will be recorded as 64.

This option will be available for only the first two of the three scheduled exams. It will not be available for Exam II, Exam III, or the final exam.

LEARNING AIDS

COOPERATIVE LEARNING GROUPS. Students are asked to form groups of 4-5 students. Groups should sit together in the lecture hall and discussion sessions. Group discussions and assignments may occur during lecture. Each group may find it helpful to study together outside of class. Group membership is to be established and identified by September 14; see your T.A. for details. One of the hallmarks of excellence of UW-Madison is the quality of its students. Share your talents with others and take advantage of the rich talent surrounding you.

LEARNING COMMUNITIES. Many departments on Campus especially in physical sciences areas have begun to collaborate extensively to promote learning across courses. This Chemistryy 103 course is part of a collaborative effort with the other courses. The Learning Community sections are 605, 607, 610, 612, 613, and 614. We are interested in the progress and potential success of such efforts and we welcome your input. Students not involved in such efforts should seek to learn about them and communicate their opinions to Professor Shakhashiri regarding possible expansion in future semesters.

WORKBOOK FOR GENERAL CHEMISTRY. The WORKBOOK Lessons provide a type of self-tutorial for each topic. These lessons provide you with written instructional materials as well as drill exercises. The format allows you to learn at your own pace by following the illustrations and examples in the Workbook.

CHEMICAL OF THE WEEK. To increase your knowledge about chemicals, their properties, production, cost, uses, etc., fact sheets about one or two key chemicals will be distributed on a weekly basis. These handouts will also be available here on the Web. You will be tested on the content of each fact sheet on each hour exam as well as on the final exam.

CHEM TIPS. Chemistry Teaching Information Processing System. The objective of CHEM TIPS is to provide information about course progress to both students and instructors. In CHEM TIPS, you are given weekly surveys composed of a set of multiple choice questions. The surveys deal primarily with the subject matter of the preceding two lectures. Within hours (usually 4) after the survey is completed, an instructional message based on your responses to the survey questions will be sent to you through electronic mail. This message identifies the correct answers to the survey questions, suggests materials for further study of areas in which your answers were incorrect, and provides additional information to help you master the course material. Your T.A. and professor will receive summary reports to let them know how the class is doing and to help them identify topics that may be causing trouble.

The surveys will be given during the last 10 minutes of Monday lectures. The responses to CHEM TIPS surveys will be scanned optically and processed by computer. Therefore, please bring a #2 pencil with you on Mondays to mark the optical scanner sheet .

Participation in the CHEM TIPS program is optional. The results are not used in preparing course grades. In the past, nearly all students participated in CHEM TIPS, and student reactions and evaluations were highly favorable. It is very important for you to stay up-to-date in your studies, and CHEM TIPS will help you do this in Chemistry 103.

TIPS was developed by Professor Allen C. Kelley, Department of Economics, Duke University. CHEM TIPS was adapted and implemented beginning in 1973 by Professor Bassam Z. Shakhashiri, Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

**** CHEM TIPS software is being revised. We may not have it operational this semester. ****

EXAM STUDY QUESTIONS. About one week prior to each examination, a list of questions taken from old exams will be distributed. You should answer the questions as part of your review and study for the exam. Compare your solutions and answers with those of fellow students. If your solutions do not agree with those of others, then you should tackle the questions together. (Most, if not all, of the answers will be provided with the questions.)

HOMEWORK EXERCISES. Homework assignments are given in the Course Outline. You are not required to turn in the assignment; consequently homework problems are not graded. You should work out the assigned problems because they are typical of the kinds of problems you are expected to master and handle with ease. If you have questions about the homework assignment, you should seek help from your T.A. in quiz section or from the T.A. in the General Chemistry Computer Room.

ADDITIONAL ACTIVITIES

BULL SESSIONS. These informal sessions are held 1-3 times during the semester. Their aim is to enable the professor to meet students in small groups. The sessions are held in the evening and are open to all those registered in this lecture section and their friends. Topics of discussion are not necessarily related to course materials. Refreshments will be served. The date of each session will be announced one week in advance.

KEEPING IN TOUCH WITH YOUR INSTRUCTORS. You should take full advantage of the availability of your lecture professor and your T.A. outside the classroom for face-to-face meetings and e-mail contact. My e-mail address is at the top of this syllabus. I usually check my e-mail box once a day and attempt to answer my mail promptly. The TA e-mail addresses are also listed in this syllabus. .

HELPFUL STUDY HINTS

Read the assignment prior to lecture. Take good notes during the lecture. Reread and study the appropriate pages in the textbook. Do the sample exercises in the book. Try the suggested exercises in the book. Also learn the key words and concepts listed on the left-hand side of this syllabus under each unit number. Use the Workbook which accompanies them.

Come to the discussion section prepared. Ask specific questions of your T.A. Make sure you understand the questions of your fellow students and the answers which your T.A. and others give.

Read the experiment. Complete the pre-lab assignment. While in lab, discuss your work with your fellow students and T.A. and complete the laboratory report before leaving unless instructed otherwise by your T.A.

I strongly encourage you to study on a weekly basis with others in your Cooperative Learning Group. One of the hallmarks of excellence of UW-Madison is the quality of its students. Share your talents with others and take advantage of the rich talent surrounding you. Make good connections!

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING SERVICE

Please take advantage of these services as soon as the need arises. Come and see me as soon as possible regarding the type of help suitable for your needs.

STUDY SKILLS. Study skills groups include discussions corresponding to the expressed needs and desires in a particular group. Possible topics include: problem solving, self-assessment, time-scheduling, note taking, exam preparation/taking, reading efficiency, memory, concentration, and avoiding procrastination. Students wishing to improve their performance on academic tasks are encouraged to participate in a group. Study skills groups usually meet for four 90-minute sessions. There is a small fee materials. PREREGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

TEST ANXIETY. The purpose of a Test Anxiety Group is to help students reduce anxious responses to test-taking situations and to acquire more relaxed attitudes. Procedures encompass exercises to promote relaxation and coping strategies for exam-taking panic. Students who believe their study skills and habits are adequate but who are not performing well on tests because of anxiety are encouraged to participate in a group. The groups usually meet for four 90-minute session. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. For dates, times, and more information about University Counseling Service, call 262-1744, or go to 905 University Avenue, Room 401, Monday Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m, and Wednesday, 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

WRITING LAB

As you work on your lab reports I'd encourage you to take advantage of the instruction offered by the University's Writing Center. Writing Center instructors can help you make your writing the best that it can be. They'll meet with you individually or with your entire group to discuss drafts of your work. They can help you get started as you're generating and organizing ideas. They can give you a critical reaction to a draft—asking questions where ideas aren't clear, pointing out problems in organization and style, and offering advice for revision.

To schedule an appointment, you need to go to the Writing Center in 6171 Helen C. White Hall. The hours are Monday through Thursday, 9:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m., and Friday, 9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m. Check the Web at www.wisc.edu/writing/ .

GREATER UNIVERSITY TUTORING SERVICE (GUTS)

GUTS offers free assistance to all enrolled UW-Madison students through a variety of programs. These include drop-in centers at the Steenbock Library, College Library, and Gordon Commons, study group tutoring, individual tutoring, study skills counseling, and exam files. For more information, visit or call the GUTS Tutoring Office, 303 Union South, 263-5666, Monday through Thursday, 1:00-5:00 p.m.

ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE

Serious impediments to learning, personal growth and development, and responsible behavior can be caused by alcohol and substance abuse. The notorious national reputation of this Campus in this regard is shameful. Please follow the guidance provided by the Officeof the Dean of Students and other officials to help achieve a drug-free environment and to exercise responsible and lawful use of alcoholic beverages.

NATIONAL CHEMISTRY WEEK

One week of November has been proclaimed as National Chemistry Week for 2001. Be on the lookout for a variety of items and activities which will be brought to your attention by me and by your TA. Also, check the University Bookstore calendar for the dates and locations of the SCIENCE IS FUN activity during the academic year.


GUIDELINES FOR DEMONSTRATION NOTES

These Guidelines should help you take effective notes about the demonstrations Professor Shakhashiri presents during lecture. The demonstrations display phenomena and illustrate principles discussed in the lecture. They are intended to enhance your understanding of the lecture material. Therefore, it is essential that you take accurate and complete notes about the demonstrations.

Three steps are involved in taking good notes about the demonstrations.

  1. Describe the equipment and materials at the start of the demonstration. Be sure to include any information Professor Shakhashiri may provide about the equipment and materials.
  2. Describe what Professor Shakhashiri does with the equipment and materials.
  3. Describe what happens as a result of what Professor Shakhashiri does. Describe the changes that occur during the process, as well as the final condition of the materials.

You should also review your notes and rewrite them when necessary to ensure clarity.

As examples, notes for some lecture demonstrations are included below; they show how a student writes out in fuller comprehensible form the abbreviated notes written down during lecture.

A. "Bubbles and Fog" Demonstration (Part 1)

include a

1. Describe the equipment and materials at the start of the demonstration. Be sure tony information Professor Shakhashiri may provide about the equipment and materials.
4 glass cylinders, each with volume of about 1 liter. One pair of cylinders contains about 800 mL of pink liquid in each cylinder. The other pair contains about 800 mL of purple liquid in each. A bucket of white solid covered with fog. The white solid is dry ice (solid carbon dioxide). Dry ice has a temperature of -78?C. It sublimes, that is, changes directly from solid to gas.
2. Describe what Professor Shakhashiri does with the equipment and materials.
Professor Shakhashiri puts on cloth gloves and drops chunks of dry ice into one of the cylinders of pink liquid and one of the cylinders of purple liquid.
3.Describe what happens.
The chunks of dry ice sink to the bottom of the liquids. Bubbles form on the dry ice and rise to the top of the liquids. Fog forms at the tops of the cylinders containing dry ice. The fog spills over the tops of the cylinders and sinks down their sides. The colors of the liquids gradually change: the pink liquid fades to colorless, the purple liquid changes to green and then to yellow. The color changes take about 30 seconds.
B. "Bubbles and Fog" Demonstration (Part 2)
1. Describe the equipment and materials at the start of the demonstration.
5-liter flask of hot water is brought into lecture hall. Red plastic dish pan. Chunks of dry ice.
2. Describe what is done with the equipment and materials.
The hot water is poured into the dish pan. Then, dry ice is poured into the hot water.
3. Describe what happens.
Cloud of fog rises to about 2 meters above the pan. Then, the cloud sinks and fog pours over the edge of the pan and onto the floor. The production of fog gradually diminishes and stops after about 3 minutes.



COURSE OUTLINE

TEXT = Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity, WKBK = Workbook for General Chemistry

UNIT 1 -- ELEMENTS AND COMPOUNDS (4 lectures)
INTRODUCTION
    Classification of matter
    Mixtures and pure substances 
    Physical properties
    Chemical properties 
    Measurement

READINGS
   TEXT Ch.1
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch.1: 6, 10,16,22,60,62,64

ELEMENTS AND ATOMS 
    Atoms 
    Atomic structure    
    Isotopes
    Relative atomic weight 
    The Periodic Table
READINGS
   TEXT 2.1 - 2.8
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 2: 24,26,30,44 
   WKBK: Lesson 1 pp 1 - 7
COMPOUNDS AND MOLECULES
    Molecules and molecular formulas
    Ions
    Ionic compounds
    Naming compounds 
READINGS
   TEXT 3.1 - 3.5
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 3: 4,12,14,16,20,22,26,28,36,38,44,94
   WKBK: Lesson 1 pp 7 - 9
THE MOLE 
    Molar mass 
    Mole calculations 
    Percent composition
    Empirical formulas 
    Hydrates
READINGS
   TEXT 3.6 - 3.8 
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 3: 10,46,48,56,58,64,68,74,82 
   WKBK: Lesson 1 pp 9 - 17
UNIT 2 -- CHEMICAL REACTIONS (4 lectures)
CHEMICAL EQUATIONS
    Balancing chemical equations 
    Mass relationships
    Stoichiometry
READINGS
   TEXT 4.1 - 4.3
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 4: 8,12,14,18,50
   WKBK: Lessons 2 & 3
CHEMICAL REACTIONS AND ANALYSIS 
    Limiting reagents 
    Percent yield
    Percent composition 
    Chemical analysis  
READINGS
   TEXT 4.4 - 4.6
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 4: 22,24,26,30,32,36
   WKBK: Lesson 4
REACTIONS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION
    Electrolytes and non-electrolytes 
    Solubility
    Precipitation reactions 
    Net-ionic equations
READINGS
   TEXT 5.1 - 5.2
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 5: 6,16,18,20,28,30,32,34,36
   WKBK: Lesson 5
TYPES OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS
    Acids and bases 
    Acid-base reactions 
    Oxidation-reduction reactions
    Oxidizing and reducing agents

READINGS
   TEXT 5.3 - 5.7
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 5: 38,40,42,44,48,50,54,56,94
   WKBK: Lesson 13 pp 145 - 151

 

Exam 1       Friday, September 28      11:00 - 11:50 a.m.

UNIT 3 -- SOLUTION STOICHIOMETRY  (1 lecture)
CONCENTRATION OF SOLUTIONS 
    Molarity
    Preparing solutions 
    Diluting solutions
    Solution stoichiometry 
    Titrations 
READINGS
   TEXT 5.8 - 5.9
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 5: 60,62,66,68,70,72,84,90 
   WKBK: Lesson 6
UNIT 4 -- CHEMICAL ENERGY  (3 lectures)

HEAT AND TEMPERATURE 
    Energy 
    Conservation of energy 
    Thermal energy
    Heat capacity
    Heat transfer
    Changes in state

READINGS
   TEXT 6.1 - 6.4 
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 6: 10,14,22,30,66
   WKBK: Lesson 8 pp 79 - 83

HEAT AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS 
    Enthalpy
    Enthalpy of fusion and vaporization
    Enthalpy of reaction
    Hess's law
READINGS
   TEXT 6.5 - 6.8
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 6: 34,38,40,42 
   WKBK: Lesson 8 pp 84 - 93 
HEAT AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS 
    Enthalpy of formation
    Caloritmetry
    Fuels 
READINGS
   TEXT 6.9 - 6.11
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 6: 46,50,52,62,70
   WKBK: Lesson 8 pp 93 - 96
UNIT 5 - ATOMIC STRUCTURE  (4 lectures)
DEVELOPMENT OF ATOMIC THEORY 
    Wave properties
    Electromagnetic radiation
    Atomic emission
    Bohr's model of the atom 
READINGS
   TEXT 7.1 - 7.3
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 7: 20,22,24,30,34,36
MODERN ATOMIC THEORY 
    Schrödinger wave equation
    Quantum numbers
    Atomic orbitals

READINGS
   TEXT 7.4 - 7.6
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 7: 46,48,54,60,76 
   WKBK: Lesson 10

ELECTRON CONFIGURATIONS 
    Magnetism and electron spin
    Pauli exclusion principle
    Electron configurations
    Electron configurations of ions

READINGS
   TEXT 8.1 - 8.5
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 8: 10,22,24,36,42

PERIODIC PROPERTIES 
    Atomic radii
    Ionic radii 
    Ionization energies
    Periodic trends in chemical properties
READINGS
   TEXT 8.6 - 8.7
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 8: 46,48,50,56,68,84
   WKBK: Lesson 11




Exam 2       Friday, October 26      11:00 - 11:50 a.m.

UNIT 6 - CHEMICAL BONDING  (2 lectures)
TYPES OF CHEMICAL BONDING 
    Valence electrons
    Ionic bonding
    Covalent bonding
    Lewis structures
    Octet rule
READINGS
   TEXT 9.1 - 9.4
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 9: 4,28,30,38ac,40 
   WKBK: Lesson 12 pp 130 - 136
COVALENT BONDING 
    Polyatomic ions 
    Resonance 
    Exceptions to octet rule
    Bond energy
    Bond polarity
    Formal charge
READINGS
   TEXT 9.4 - 9.6 
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 9: 10,38bd,42,48,50,56,60,64,70 
   WKBK: Lesson 12 pp 137 - 144
                  Lesson 13 pp 152 - 155
UNIT 7 - MOLECULAR STRUCTURE (3 lectures)
MOLECULAR SHAPES 
    Describing molecular shapes
    VSEPR
    Molecular polarity
READINGS
   TEXT 9.7 - 9.8 
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 9: 24,76,82,86,90,92,98  
   WKBK: Lesson 14
VALENCE BOND THEORY  
    Overlap of atomic arbitals
    Hybrid atomic orbitals
    Geometry and bonding
READINGS
   TEXT 10.1 - 10.2 
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 10: 16,18,22a,24,48   
   WKBK: Lesson 15
VALENCE BOND THEORY  
    Multiple bonds
    Sigma and pi bonds
    Cis-trans isomers
    Resonance bonding
READINGS
   TEXT 10.2 
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 10: 20,22bc,28,38,44 
UNIT 8 - GASES  (2 lectures)
IDEAL GAS LAW
    Pressure 
    Boyle's law
    Charles's law
    Avogadro's law 
    Ideal gas law 
    Partial pressure
    Dalton's law

READINGS
   TEXT 12.1 - 12.5 
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 12: 10,14,16,20,26,28,32,52  
   WKBK: Lesson 8
KINETIC MOLECULAR THEORY
    Postulates
    Molecular kinetic energy
    Molecular speed
    Diffusion and effusion
    Deviations from ideal gas

READINGS
   TEXT 12.6 - 12.9 
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 12: 60,62,64,68,88




Exam 3       Monday, November 19      11:00 - 11:50 a.m.

UNIT 9 - LIQUIDS AND SOLIDS  (4 lectures)
INTERMOLECULAR FORCES 
    Dipoles
    Polar molecules 
    Induced dipoles
    Hydrogen bonding
READINGS
   TEXT 13.1 - 13.2
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 13: 16,18,22,26,60
PROPERTIES OF LIQUIDS
    Surface tension
    Vaporization
    Vapor pressure
    Boiling point
    Crystallization
    Freezing point
    Critical temperature

READINGS
   TEXT 13.3 
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 13: 24,68,72,76
THE SOLID STATE 
    Types of solids
    Crystalline solids
    Unit cells
    Metals
    Ionic crystals 
    X-ray crystallography

READINGS
   TEXT 13.4
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 13: 40,48,50,78
OTHER TYPES OF SOLIDS 
    Molecular solids 
    Network solids
    Amorphous solids
    Changes of state
READINGS
   TEXT 13.5 - 13.7
EXERCISES
   TEXT Ch. 13: 52
UNIT 10 - CHEMISTRY OF THE HALOGENS (2 lectures)

    Elements
    Compounds
    Structure
    Reactions

READINGS
   Special Handouts
   TEXT  22.9



Final Exam      Thursday, December 20      12:25 - 2:25 p.m.

32nd Annual Presentation of
"Once Upon a Christmas Cheery, In the Lab of Shakhashiri"

Saturday and Sunday, December 1 and 2


Chemistry 103 - Lecture Section 1 - Fall 2001

Lecture and Laboratory Schedule

DATE LECTURE TOPIC LABORATORY
Sept 5 (W) Introduction & Unit 1 No Lab
Sept 7 (F) Unit 1 - Elements & Compounds

Sept 10 (M) Unit 1 - Elements & Compounds
Sept 12 (W) Unit 1 - Elements & Compounds Solutions, Density and Graph
Sept 14 (F) Reinforcement & Enrichment

Sept 17 (M) Unit 2 - Chemical Reactions
Sept 19 (W) Unit 2 - Chemical Reactions Lake Study
Sept 21 (F) Reinforcement & Enrichment

Sept 24 (M) Unit 2 - Chemical Reactions
Sept 26 (W) Unit 2 - Chemical Reactions Check-in, Reaction of Zinc and Iodine
Sept 28 (F) EXAM  I    11:00 - 11:50 a.m.

Oct 1 (M) Unit 3 - Solution Stoichiometry
Oct 2 (W) Unit 4 - Chemical Energy Reaction Types and Chemical Logic
Oct 4 (F) Retake Exam I

Oct 8 (M) Unit 4 - Chemical Energy
Oct 10 (W) Unit 4 - Chemical Energy Synthesis of an Alum
Oct 12 (F) Reinforcement & Enrichment

Oct 15 (M) Unit 5 - Atomic Structure
Oct 17 (W) Unit 5 - Atomic Structure No Lab
Oct 19 (F) Reinforcement & Enrichment

Oct 22 (M) Unit 5 - Atomic Structure
Oct 24 (W) Unit 5 - Atomic Structure Solution Calorimetry
Oct 26 (F) EXAM  II    11:00 - 11:50 a.m.

Oct 29 (M) Unit 6 - Chemical Bonding
Oct 31 (W) Unit 6 - Chemical Bonding No Lab
Nov 2 (F) Unit 7 - Molecular Structure

Nov 5 (M) Unit 7 - Molecular Structure
Nov 7 (W) Unit 7 - Molecular Structure Determination of the Alcohol Content in Wine
Nov 9 (F) Reinforcement & Enrichment

Nov 12 (M) Unit 8 - Gases
Nov 14 (W) Unit 8 - Gases Periodic Table Live
Nov 16 (F) No Lecture

Nov 19 (M) EXAM  III    11:00 - 11:50 a.m.
Nov 21 (W) No Lecture No Lab
Nov 23 (F) Thanksgiving Recess

Nov 26 (M) Unit 9 - Liquids & Solids
Nov 28 (W) Unit 9 - Liquids & Solids Lab Practial
Nov 30 (F) No Lecture

Dec 3 (M) Unit 9 - Liquids & Solids
Dec 5 (W) Unit 9 - Liquids & Solids A Window on the Solid State
Dec 7 (F) Reinforcement & Enrichment

Dec 10 (M) Unit 10 - Halogen Chemistry
Dec 12 (W) Unit 10 - Halogen Chemistry Solid-State Structures, Check-out
Dec 14 (F) No Lecture

Dec 20 (R) FINAL EXAM    12:25 - 2:25 p.m.

32nd Annual Once Upon a Christmas Cheery in the Lab of Shakhashiri

Saturday and Sunday, December 1 and 2




DUE To Your TA Friday, September 14

CHEMISTRY 103 — Lecture Section 1
Professor Bassam Z. Shakhashiri

INFORMATION SHEET
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